In Julius Caesar, Brutus believes that Caesar must die in order to keep the Romale Republic and defend the citizens from tyranny. Brutus feels that Caesar is overly ambitious and also would eventually ascendancy Rome as a cruel tyrant.

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In act 1, scene 2 of William Shakespeare"s Julius Caesar, Cassius is talking via Brutus on a street in Rome, trying to discover what"s troubling Brutus, as soon as a crowd of Romale citizens in one more street raises a shout in praise of Caesar. Brutus remarks,

BRUTUS. What suggests this...


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In act 1, scene 2 of William Shakespeare"s Julius Caesar, Cassius is talking with Brutus on a street in Rome, trying to find what"s troubling Brutus, as soon as a crowd of Romale citizens in one more street raises a shout in praise of Caesar. Brutus remarks,

BRUTUS. What means this shouting? I do fear the peopleChoose Caesar for their king (1.2.84–85).

This provides Cassius an possibility to confide to Brutus that he, also, shares Brutus"s involves about Caesars ambitions. It also offers him the possibility to remind Brutus that among his ancestors, Lucius Julius Brutus, was critical in expelling the last king of Rome and ended up being a founder of the Roman Republic virtually 450 years earlier. Since that time, no king has actually ruled over Rome, yet Caesar is now giving eexceptionally indication that he wants to be made king of Rome.

In February of 44 BCE, a month before the first scenes of Julius Caesar take place, Caesar declares himself "Dictator perpetuo," meaning "Dictator for Life." Brutus and also Cassio learn from Casca that Caesar has simply perdeveloped a deft little bit of political theatre in front of a huge crowd of Roguy citizens by seeming to disapprove a crown offered to him by his friend Marc Antony, which only incites the crowd to urge Caesar to accept it.

Brutus invites Cassius to dinner the following evening so that they can comment on the matter additionally. Early the following morning, but, Cassius shows up at Brutus"s house with 5 various other guys, whose intent is to convince Brutus to sign up with them in assassinating Caesar.

Brutus does not require a lot convincing. He"s already wrestled through his own individual feelings around Caesar—in act 1, scene 2, Brutus tells Cassius that he"s been "with himself at war" (1.2.51) about it— and he"s thought about the concerns of Caesar"s unrestrained ambition and his raising peril to the Romale Republic.

Brutus decides to join the conspirators and assumes the obligation of organizing them for the assassination.

The reason why Brutus joins via the other conspirators is that Caesar"s ambitions, his rise to nearly absolute power, his popularity via the civilization of Rome, his rejection of Roguy institutions—such as the Senate, which he treats with contempt—and his desire to be king, all pose a severe and immediate risk to the Roman Republic. Brutus explains this succinctly in his oration to the civilization of Rome after Caesar"s assassination.

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BRUTUS. If tbelow be any type of in thisassembly, any kind of dear friend of Caesar"s, to him I say thatBrutus" love to Caesar was no less than his. If then thatfrifinish demand also why Brutus climbed versus Caesar, this is myanswer: Not that I loved Caesar much less, yet that I loved Romeeven more (3.2.19–24).