Eating frog legs for dinner? Add a tiny salt to them before food preparation and they could put on a show for you -- even when they"re not attached to the frog"s body.

You are watching: Why do frog legs twitch with salt


It"s an remarkable quirk, yet a pinch of salt can make the legs of dead frogs twitch and writhe as if they"ve been brought ago to life, according to an episode of "Outrageous Acts Of Science," a Science Channel series.


Biologist Adam Ruben shelp the twitchy phenomenon happens bereason some cells still continue to be alive lengthy after the creature is brain dead.

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"If you die, you’ve gained many cells in you that will be about for weeks to come," he sassist on the show. "It’s the exact same thing with these frogs. You have actually living cells, still attached to workable machinery. So if you can fool those cells right into thinking that they must move, they will actually begin to relocate and flex and also perform what cells do."


"In this situation, you have the right to fake the signal that the brain is sending salt which has actually positively charged sodium ions, which is exactly what tells the nerves when to fire," he shelp on the display. "And so that gets into the nerve cells, they tell the muscle cells to contract, and you deserve to make the frog dance." Not everyone is most likely to try the frog leg have the right to can, according to Saar Sadwana, a published scientist and standup comic.


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This image from television provided by Metro Fire Sacramento mirrors a horse stuck in an outdoor bathtub before being rescued by firefighters Wednesday Feb. 4, 2015. The horse, named Phantom, was stuck in the bathtub for around 25 minutes. Her owner witnessed the horse fall and also referred to as the fire department. Phantom, a Palomino/Appaloosa mix, was not injured. (AP Photo/Metro Fire Sacramento)